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Mozart wrote a canon entitled ‘Leck mich im Arsch‘, which translates into English as ‘Lick me in the arse.‘

Mozart wrote a canon entitled ‘Leck mich im Arsch‘, which translates into English as ‘Lick me in the arse.‘
Mozart wrote a canon entitled ‘Leck mich im Arsch‘, which translates into English as ‘Lick me in the arse.‘

"Leck mich im Arsch" (literally "Lick Me in the Ass") is a canon in B-flat major composed by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, K. 231 (K. 382c), with lyrics in German. It was one of a set of at least six canons probably written in Vienna in 1782.Sung by six voices as a three-part round, it is thought to be a party piece for his friends. The main theme is derived from the final movement of Joseph Haydn's Symphony No. 3 in G-Major.

"Lick me in the arse" is a calque of the song's title and lyrics into English. A more idiomatic translation would be the English "Kiss my arse!" or American "Kiss my ass!"

Mozart died in 1791 and his widow, Constanze Mozart, sent the manuscripts of the canons to publishers Breitkopf & Härtel in 1799 saying that they would need to be adapted for publication. The publisher changed the title and lyrics of this canon to the more acceptable "Laßt froh uns sein" ("Let us be glad!"). Of Mozart's original text, only the first words were documented in the catalogue of his works produced by Breitkopf & Härtel.

A new text version, which may have been the authentic one, came to light in 1991. Handwritten texts to this and several other similar canons were found added to a printed score of the work in an historical printed edition acquired by Harvard University's Music Library. They had evidently been added to the book by a later hand. However, since in six of the pieces these entries matched texts that had, in the meantime, independently come to light in original manuscripts, it was hypothesised that the remaining three may, too, have been original, including texts for K. 231 ("Leck mich im Arsch" itself), and another Mozart work, "Leck mir den Arsch fein recht schön sauber" ("Lick my arse nice and clean", K. 233; K. 382d in the revised numbering). Later research revealed that the latter work was likely composed by Wenzel Trnka.


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